Wells Fargo: Get your money out of our democracy

The American economy is broken – it works for the wealthiest 1% and large corporation like Wells Fargo, not the 99%.

Banks have been controlling the economy for too long, setting the rules up in their own favor and escaping justice when their greed has devastating effects. It’s because they have the best government that their money can buy.

 

 

No more big bank money in our political system.

Wells Fargo and its top executives use money to make government work for them.

Wells Fargo makes contributions to candidates, ballot initiatives, Political Action Committees, and lobbyists in order secure preferential treatment from our government.

From 2008-2010 Wells Fargo spent:

  • $156,841 on State Ballot Measures[1]
  • $1,300,250 in Federal Candidate Contributions[2]
  • $11,040,000 in Lobbying Expenses[3]

From 2008-2010 Wells Fargo received:

  • $680,800,000 in a U.S. Tax Refund[4]
  • $49,370,000,000 in U.S. Profits[5]

The solution:

To secure a government of, by, and for the people we need to get unlimited, undisclosed corporate money out.

  • Wells Fargo must pledge to keep its money out of elections: Disclose corporate money in elections to date and pledge to keep all Wells Fargo money out of the 2012 and future elections.

 

>> Read more on our work to confront corporate power and Wells Fargo specifically.
>> Back to the WANTED: Wells Fargo page


[1] National Institute on Money in State Politics, www.followthemoney.org, Retrieved on March 22, 2012:http://www.followthemoney.org/database/topcontributor.phtml?u=2818&y=0 [2] Center for Responsive Politics, www.opensecrets.org, retrieved on March 22, 2012:http://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/pacgot.php?cmte=C00034595&cycle=2008  [3] Public Campaign. December 2011. “For Hire: Lobbyists or the 99%? How Corporations Pay More for Lobbyists Than in Taxes.” Page 2: http://publicampaign.org/sites/default/files/ReportTaxDodgerLobbyingDec6Final_rev.pdf [4] Citizens for Tax Justice & the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, November 2011, “Corporate Taxpayers and Corporate Tax Dodgers, 2008-2010.” Page 49: http://www.ctj.org/corporatetaxdodgers/CorporateTaxDodgersReport.pdf  [5] Citizens for Tax Justice & the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, November 2011, “Corporate Taxpayers and Corporate Tax Dodgers, 2008-2010.” Page 49:http://www.ctj.org/corporatetaxdodgers/CorporateTaxDodgersReport.pdf