This year we are very lucky to be having four nationally recognized leaders coming to Iowa to speak at our Money Out, People In: Confront Corporate Power Statewide Convention.

 

Each speaker will present a workshop, and all four will speak at a panel discussion after lunch.

 

Below are their bios, a few words why staff are excited they are coming and a video clip!

 

Heather McGhee

Heather is the Director of the Washington office of Demos, a non-partisan policy center working on developing strategies for a more equitable economy, a more  robust democracy and a strong public sector that can provide for everyday people’s common interests and needs. Heather is an influential and dynamic speaker, with frequent commentary featured in media outlets like Current TV, MSNBC, NPR, the New York Times and CNN. Her vision centers on working towards a new economy that includes and functions for everyday people.

Why is Chris excited for Heather’s workshop?

“I first met Heather at the National People’s Action Organizers Conference (NPA), where she fired up the room by talking about the need to meet the pro-corporate agenda head on. I can’t wait to hear Heather speak because she has been a leading voice for young people, powerfully demanding that the generation now entering the workforce has everything they need to live to their full potential to keep the American Dream alive.”

Listen to a few words from Heather on big money in politics:

 

 

Sally Kohn

Sally  is a veteran community organizer and passionate political commentator. She was Senior Campaign Strategist with the Center for Community Change, a 40-year-old hub of grassroots organizations nationwide. Sally makes complex political issues accessible for everyday audiences. A grassroots strategist actively engaged in movement building for equality and justice, she is a regular on Fox News (including Hannity, O’Reilly Factor, Megyn Kelly), CNN (American Morning, CNN Newsroom) and MSNBC (Ed Show).

Why is Adam excited for Sally’s workshop?

“The first time I met Sally, I knew she was a “speak truth to power” justice fighter. Now five years later you can find Sally giving them hell on Fox News, writing great op-eds and stories with a tough progressive take on today’s public issues, or luckily enough – at the Iowa CCI Convention!”

Listen to Sally speak on Fox News regarding the revenue crisis  and taxing the rich:

 

Lisa Graves

Lisa is the Executive Director of the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD), the publisher of PR Watch, SourceWatch, BanksterUSA, and ALECexposed.org. The CMD has been one of the leading forces behind uncovering the inner workings of the right-wing think tank, American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which pushed “Stand your ground”, voter ID and anti-immigrant laws across the country. Lisa previously served as a senior advisor in all three branches of the federal government, as well as a leading strategist on civil liberties advocacy. She has also appeared as an expert on CNN, MSNBC, BBC and on numerous radio shows, including National Public Radio and Democracy Now!

Why is Matthew excited for Lisa’s workshop?

“If you don’t know who Lisa is she runs the Center for Media and Democracy which was the first organization to blow the lid wide open on ALEC’s (American Legislative Exchange Council) dirty secrets. I’m particularly excited to see her because I know she will lay bare the corporate manifesto and right wing spin machine, exposing the corporate lies and disinformation from ALEC to Fox News.”

Check out the video below to see Lisa at a D.C. rally protesting ALEC’s “Stand Your Ground” law:

 

Mark Schultz

Mark is a long-time friend and ally of Iowa CCI. As the Policy Program Director of Land Stewardship Project in Minnesota and an integral partner in the Campaign for Family Farms and the Environment he confronted corporate power by organizing the campaign against the mandatory pork check-off. Mark was also a founding board member of our NPA allies to the north, TakeAction Minnesota, and currently serves as their board chair. For his take on corporate power and structural racism, click here.

Why is Ruth excited for Mark’s workshop?

“You should come see Mark Schultz from Land Stewardship Project (LSP) for one main reason. Forget that LSP passed local control in Minnesota. Forget that they’re fighting frack sand mining corporations. Forget that they are taking on corporate power in the health care industry. Just know this: Mark Schultz is the best organizer I know.  And, I’m not just saying that because he’s my dad! ;)”

Get to know a little more about Mark and his organizing by watching this video:

 

Each speaker will present a workshop, and all four will speak at a panel discussion on confronting corporate power to reclaim our democracy!

>>Go back to the convention homepage

>> Learn more about the workshop sessions

RSVP online today or contact us at 515-255-0800.


Click LIKE and TWEET to invite your friends to join you!

You and I have a key opportunity to elevate our “People First” message in the media and with the political parties Jan. 3.

Since the national spotlight is on us, we are uniquely positioned to drive home – in a big way – a vision of good government that puts communities before corporations and people before profits.

That’s why we’re asking you to print out and take the resolutions below  to your caucuses and work to get them adopted into the party platform.  Our resolutions are woven together by a common theme – that government needs to work for everyday people and the 99%, not big money corporate interests and the 1%.

Step 1: Print out the resolutions

Step 2: Find your caucus location

All caucuses begin at 7 pm on Tuesday, Jan. 3. It is recommended you get there 20-30 minutes early. You must be registered as a Democrat or a Republican to participate in the party’s caucus, but don’t worry you can register or re-register at the door. Just in case bring your photo ID and a document, like a bill, that proves where you live. If you’ll be 18 by election day (11/6/12), you can participate!

Step 3: Attend and work to get your resolution introduced

Resolutions are general presented towards the end. Be prepared to read it aloud. If passed resolutions work their way up through both party platforms. It’s a great way to show party leaders that we’re fed up with business as usual from Washington DC, Wall Street and at our Iowa Statehouse.

Step 4: Let us know how it goes!

Contact us at 515-282-0484 or shoot us a line at iowacci @ iowacci.org to let us know your resolution passed and what precinct you are in. Also, don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions. 

 

Please click “Like” or “Tweet” below to encourage your friends to take these caucus resolutions to their caucus!

 

“When old ladies in Iowa share the same concerns as kids on the street in Manhattan, it’s time those in power took note.”

 

Read this article online at www.yesmagazine.org

by Jonathan Matthew Smucker  posted Oct 18, 2011

Much has been made by some news outlets and pundits about the supposed “incoherence” of the Occupy Wall Street protests. “The protesters” don’t have a coherent message, we are told. They can’t even agree on any solutions. What the heck are they proposing?

This angle is wrong-headed. The strongest and most successful social movements in history have always tapped into multiple concerns that are important to different swaths of society, and often articulated in different ways. It’s not typically the responsibility of a broad movement to propose specific policy solutions—at least not at this stage in the process. It’s on us to create pressure to move society in a direction. When we do that successfully, windows will open to fight for this or that specific change. The bigger a movement we grow, the more pressure we create, the more substantial and meaningful those windows for measurable gains become.

The strongest and most successful social movements in history have always tapped into multiple concerns that are important to different swaths of society.

And historical perspective is not all that’s wrong with the “incoherence” frame. There’s a pretty damn clear coherence to Americans’ anger at Wall Street right now. If it doesn’t upset you that the top 1% is still making record-high profits and paying record-low taxes while the rest of us struggle just to survive, then I don’t know that I’ll be able to explain it to you. But I think most people feel it in their gut. That’s why us being here is resonating with so many people. That’s why this movement is drawing so much attention, and why I think it’s going to continue to gain momentum over time.

The momentum is really starting to spread beyond the “usual suspects.” It’s important to emphasize and encourage this. For example, while coastal occupation actions have drawn the most media attention so far, actions are also happening all across “Middle America,” from Ashland, Kentucky to Dallas, Texas to Ketchum, Idaho.

I just heard a first hand report about four hundred Iowans marching in Des Moines, Iowa as part of the October 15 international day of action. I’m working on the press team here at Occupy Wall Street, and I just got the chance to talk on the phone with Judy Lonning, a 69-year-old retired public school teacher who participated in the Des Moines action today. Here’s what she had to say:

People are suffering here in Iowa. Family farmers are struggling, students face mounting debt and fewer good jobs, and household incomes are plummeting. We’re not willing to keep suffering for Wall Street’s sins. People here are waking up and realizing that we can’t just go to the ballot box. We’re building a movement to make our leaders listen.

Cheers to that.

Jonathan Matthew Smucker wrote this article for Beyond The Choir, a forum for grassroots mobilization.