The problems with our current healthcare system are clear: the insurance and pharmaceutical industries are designed to profit off our illnesses, the elderly, and the disabled.

This is wrong, it keeps us sick, and we demand a new system that is publicly-owned, equitably funded, and not-for-profit.

A solution: The Medicare for All Act of 2019.  This bill would replace the inadequate patchwork of private insurance, out-of-pocket payment, and public programs which currently subsidize our healthcare.

An expanded and improved Medicare program would ensure that every single person in our country has guaranteed access to comprehensive health services, including dental, vision, prescription drugs, reproductive health services, and long-term care.

Under this system, patients would not be saddled with out of pocket expenses, meaning the 80 million uninsured and underinsured Americans—who are disproportionately people of color, poor people, LGBTQ, elderly, or disabled—would no longer have to go without healthcare due to the burden of cost.

Put simply, improved Medicare for All would provide better, more comprehensive healthcare for less money than we are currently spending on healthcare.

It’s time for our elected officials to take action.

Call your Iowa Representative today and tell them to cosponsor the Medicare for All Act of 2019:

  • Congressional District 1: Abby Finkenauer

Washington, DC office: (202) 225-2911

  • Congressional District 2: Dave Loebsack

Washington, DC office: (202) 225-6576

Iowa City office: (319) 351-0789

  • Congressional District 3: Cindy Axne

Washington, DC office: (202) 225-5476

Council Bluffs office: (712) 890-3117

  • Congressional District 4: Steve King

Washington, DC office: (202) 225-4426

Ames office: (515) 232-2885

After you make your call, please let us know how it went or what you heard. Contact us here. http://iowacci.org/contact-us/

Read more:

We are sad to share that CCI Action member, longtime journalist, and dedicated organizer Scott Galindez passed away last week of kidney failure.

If we had a healthcare system that truly worked for people — not insurance profits — there’s a darn good chance Scott would still be with us today and for many days into the future.

THIS is why we fight.

Scott believed wholeheartily in guaranteed healthcare for all. That’s why he penned this last article from his hospice room in Mason City that was published just before he died: “The most important legislation of my lifetime. Please read it.

And keep this important fight going strong in his memory:

  1. Share the heck out of Scott’s article.
  2. Join us for one of these Healthcare town halls next week:

Scott was a fighter. Let’s honor his memory. Let’s win this healthcare fight.

 

Senators Grassley and Ernst will be holding town hall meetings on April 18 and April 20.

Town halls are a great opportunity to raise our issues and hold elected officials accountable back home in their districts. It’s our job to remind them that they work for we the people, not big corporations and Wall St. that want to cut our safety net to line their already wealthy pockets.

Sen. Ernst’s town hall will be Tuesday, April 18:

  • 1pm: Wall Lake Community Center, 101 Boyer St, Wall Lake

Sen. Grassley’s two town halls will be:

  • Tuesday, April 18: 2:30pm at Keokuk County Courthouse, 101 S. Main St., Sigourney
  • Thursday, April 20: 10am at Iowa State Bank, 500 Audubon St., Sac City

Attend a town hall and ask a question about issues you care about the most!  We’ve heard that Medicaid and SNAP benefits (also known as food stamps) could be on the chopping block during this Congress.

Here’s a few talking points if you’re able to ask a question on one of these issues:

  • Our Medicaid should be controlled by us, it is here to take care of our family, friends, and neighbors, it should not exist to line the pockets of private corporations with our tax dollars.
  • The average monthly SNAP benefit in Iowa is $108 dollars and for every dollar spent on SNAP, it generates $1.80 in economic activity in the state.
  • Block-granting these programs doesn’t provide “flexibility” to states – it’s a benefit cut.  Block granting eliminates the ability for these programs to respond to increased need that results from rising poverty and unemployment during economic downturns.

For more information or to run a question past us, call the office at 515-282-0484!